What should I do? Sue the government to restore justice and get the compensation you deserve. Well, maybe. Each case is different. Some things you might want to consider include: what kind of evidence do you have to prove that the scrutiny is based on the EEO complaint? Should you hire an attorney to better make your case? Is it worth it to pursue this further?

These are all great questions. On the evidence question, consider: does the timing suggest retaliation. Did your boss make specific comments that suggests retaliation to you or someone else? If so, what was said? To whom? Were there any written notes made of this meeting or shortly thereafter? Has your boss retaliated against other individuals? Is your boss’ personality one that suggests they have a retaliatory tendency? Has a reason been provided for the scrutiny? If so, is the reasoning legitimate? If no reason has been provided, is there a legitimate reason for the scrutiny? When you say scrutiny what exactly do you mean? Did the scrutiny not exist before the EEO complaint? Do you have direct evidence your boss knows about the EEO complaint or does circumstantial evidence suggest same?

As you can see, so much defends on the particular facts, and facts are what a court finds. That is why most people, even attorneys, should work with an attorney if they good case, and especially if they have a good case. If you are interested in a free consultation with our firm to see if you have the type of case we be interested in handling, please feel free to reach out to us to speak with one of our federal employment attorneys